Weigh-2-Go: For the traveling diver

Conventional Weights

Conventional Weights

For those divers who, when traveling, prefer the convenience of using their own equipment, Zymurgy Inc., have developed a range of portable weights that won’t put your airline baggage allowance over the top.

The brain-child of Zymurgy Inc.’s Junior Design Engineer, Richard Nicholls, the ‘Weigh-2-Go’ series features 1, 2, 3 and 4 kg weights in a variety of mix-’n’-match hues for complete colour co-ordination with the rest of your diving equipment.

Constructed from sturdy polypropylene the ‘weights’ are hollow containers marginally larger than the ‘normal’ lead variety and contoured to mould themselves comfortably to the body. Each canister features two low profile, screw-top, filling caps, one allowing ingress of water while the other permits the escape of residual air.

Threaded onto a conventional webbing belt the whole unit is lightweight and easy to carry until required for use. Once at the dive site the user simply fills the containers with the water into which they will dive, either salt- or fresh.

“The beauty of the Zymurgy Inc., ‘Weigh-2-Go’ weighting system,” said David Strike, (International Marketing Director for the consortium of Diving Technologists who constitute the Board of this dynamic R&D company) “is its ability to quickly adapt to any density of water without the need to add or subtract weights from the main component.

“It must be remembered, however”, he added, “that a ‘filled’ unit is only completely valid in water conditions approximating, or identical, to that within the container. As an example, fresh water – weighing approximately 3.00 Kpa – is considerably lighter than ocean water that weighs about 3.07 Kpa. Diving with fresh-water filled ‘Weigh-2-Go’ units in the ocean will give a normally perfectly weighted diver positive buoyancy. Whereas a diver using salt-water filled ‘Weigh-2-Go’ weights in a fresh-water environment will be negatively buoyant.”

A minor consideration when viewed against the advantages of carrying your own perfectly weighted system with you whenever you travel.

—ENDS—

INTRODUCTION TO ZYMURGY INC.

At the close of the first Tec-Asia Diving Conference – held in Singapore in 1996 – several of the speakers repaired to the Billiard Room bar of Raffles Hotel to enjoy a quiet drink. Inevitably, the conversation drifted towards technical diving and the challenges that its future development posed to equipment manufacturers.

Inspired by the efforts of the bar staff, we decided to launch our own equipment manufacturing company that later became, Zymurgy Inc.; a word that, according to my battered copy of the Oxford English Dictionary, is defined as that, “branch of applied chemistry dealing with the science of wine-making, brewing, and distilling.”

Given that all of the company’s founders had, from the perspective of consumers, significant knowledge of all three aspects of that branch of chemistry, ‘zymurgy’ always struck me as an appropriate name.



Categories: Counter-Strike

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4 replies

  1. What a great innovation!

    Divers are drilled about remaining hydrated so is probably safe to assume that if a diver find themselves in a saltwater environment they could add drinking water to the pouch to correct the buoyancy issue Mr at Nicholls refers to. Equally, can I suggest to the designers they incorporate a small, watertight bag of salt (gratis of course) so that any over correction can be rectified. By the end of the holiday they should have worked out just how much to adjust by and can note in their logbooks with their left handed pencil.

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  2. Striker. I am confused. Is there any lead involved? Water is not going to provide negative buoyancy.

    Grant

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

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